Understanding what makes your skin tick; the unique biological rhythm of our skin cells.

All the cells in our body follow a rhythm throughout the day which is controlled by our own internal clock or our ‘clock’ gene.

These clock genes impact our biological functions and adapt in the presence of light and dark. This means that our cells create their own pattern of activity depending on the time of day.

Our epidermal cells have their own clock gene mechanism, which is separate from the rest of the body. As our skin is engaged in different activities throughout the day, it needs specific nourishment at certain times to enable it to function at its best.

Understanding the skins rhythm and identifying when different processes are occurring is key to developing efficient products that prevent skin damage, boost repair and restore balance.

Understanding what makes your skin tick; the unique biological rhythm of our skin cells.

All the cells in our body follow a rhythm throughout the day which is controlled by our own internal clock or our ‘clock’ gene.

These clock genes impact our biological functions and adapt in the presence of light and dark. This means that our cells create their own pattern of activity depending on the time of day.

Our epidermal cells have their own clock gene mechanism, which is separate from the rest of the body. As our skin is engaged in different activities throughout the day, it needs specific nourishment at certain times to enable it to function at its best.

Understanding the skins rhythm and identifying when different processes are occurring is key to developing efficient products that prevent skin damage, boost repair and restore balance.

The daily pattern of activity.

The daily pattern of activity.

During the day our skin will thicken to fulfil it’s primary function of providing protection against a myriad of environmental stresses such as sunlight, pollution, oxidative stress and free radicals.

In the afternoon trans-epidermal water loss can occur, which leaves our skin feeling dehydrated and over stimulates the oil glands resulting in excess sebum production. It is also during the afternoon that our skin is working on DNA repair and is working to fix any damage caused by exposure to the elements.

At night our skin is in regeneration mode. The cell division that takes place to restore and repair the epidermis peaks at night. Our skin gets to work removing old skin cells, growing new ones and improving blood circulation to ensure ample amounts of oxygen and nutrients are being delivered to build new proteins such as collagen and elastin.

The skin barrier is more permeable at night and oil production is at its lowest so it needs more moisture, especially if trans-epidermal water loss in the day has already left your skin dehydrated.

During the day our skin will thicken to fulfil it’s primary function of providing protection against a myriad of environmental stresses such as sunlight, pollution, oxidative stress and free radicals.

In the afternoon trans-epidermal water loss can occur, which leaves our skin feeling dehydrated and over stimulates the oil glands resulting in excess sebum production. It's also during the afternoon that our skin is working on DNA repair and attempts to fix damage caused by exposure to the elements.

At night our skin is in regeneration mode. The cell division that takes place to restore and repair the epidermis peaks at night. Our skin gets to work removing old skin cells, growing new ones and improving blood circulation to ensure ample amounts of oxygen and nutrients are being delivered to build new proteins such as collagen and elastin.

The skin barrier is more permeable at night and oil production is at its lowest so it needs more hydration, especially if trans-epidermal water loss in the day has already left your skin dehydrated.

Modern day technology and the dysregulation of our circadian rhythm.

Our clock genes monitor the presence of light and dark, adapting their pattern of activity as and when there is a change. When the natural light starts to fade your cells starts to produce melatonin which signals your brain that its almost time to go to sleep. The presence of light during this time can disrupt the circadian rhythm and play havoc on the natural pattern of activity.

Whilst daylight isn’t a problem at this time, high energy blue light as emitted from computers, tablets and mobile phones - and sits on the same spectrum as UV light - slows down the production of melatonin. Blue light can penetrate more layers of your skin than both UVA and UVB rays. When this light is absorbed deep in the hypodermis (the third and deepest layer of skin) it causes a desynchronisation of the circadian rhythm, preventing your cells from behaving as they should and damaging the structure of your skin.

Modern day technology and the dysregulation of our circadian rhythm.

Our clock genes monitor the presence of light and dark, adapting their pattern of activity as and when there is a change. When the natural light starts to fade your cells starts to produce melatonin which signals your brain that it's almost the time to go to sleep. The presence of light during this time can disrupt the circadian rhythm and play havoc on the natural pattern of activity.

Whilst daylight isn’t a problem at this time, high energy blue light as emitted from computers, tablets and mobile phones - and sits on the same spectrum as UV light - slows down the production of melatonin. Blue light can penetrate more layers of your skin than both UVA and UVB rays. When this light is absorbed deep in the hypodermis (the third and deepest layer of skin) it causes a deregulation of the circadian rhythm, preventing your cells from behaving as they should and damaging the structure of your skin by breaking down collagen and elastin fibres.

Dermal homeostasis balance and our neurological stress response.

Modern day technology and the dysregulation of our circadian rhythm.

Our clock genes monitor the presence of light and dark, adapting their pattern of activity as and when there is change. When the natural light starts to fade your cells starts to produce melatonin which signals your brain that its nearing the time to go to sleep. The presence of light during this time can disrupt the circadian rhythm and play havoc on the natural pattern of activity.

Whilst natural light isn’t a problem at this time, blue (HEV) light as emitted from computers, tablets and mobile phones - and sits on the same spectrum as UV light - slows down the production of melatonin. Blue (HEV) light can penetrate more layers of your skin than both UVA and UVB rays. When this light is absorbed deep in the hypodermis (the third and deepest layer of skin) it causes a deregulation of the circadian rhythm, preventing your cells from behaving as they should and damaging the structure of your skin by breaking down collagen and elastin fibres.

Our circadian rhythm is closely connected to our internal stress response. Cortisol, the stress hormone, is released at specific times as regulated by our clock genes. When we wake, cortisol levels are at a natural high but these decline as our body begins to release adrenaline and serotonin.

Physical, mental and emotional stress can disrupt the natural fluctuation of our cortisol levels and create an imbalance in the skin’s homeostasis. This imbalance can lead to an impaired barrier function and thinner more permeable skin, making it harder for your skin to protect itself from environmental aggressors during the day. Chronic elevated cortisol levels also interfere with DNA repair and negatively impact collagen and elastin fibres.

Dermal homeostasis balance and our neurological stress response.

Our circadian rhythm is closely connected to our internal stress response. Cortisol, the stress hormone, is released at specific times as regulated by our clock genes. When we wake, cortisol levels are at a natural high but these decline as our body begins to release adrenaline and serotonin.

Physical, mental and emotional stress can disrupt the natural fluctuation of our cortisol levels and create an imbalance in the skin’s homeostasis. This imbalance can lead to an impaired barrier function and thinner more permeable skin, making it harder for your skin to protect itself from environmental aggressors during the day. Chronic elevated cortisol levels also interfere with DNA repair and negatively impact structural proteins such as collagen and elastin fibres.

Click here to learn how Lotus Potion products work in harmony with your skins natural circadian rhythm.